Work Study Position

Application for University Research Internship Work Study Position

Dr. Hard will have two openings for University Research Internship Work Study Positions to assist him with his research projects. These positions will be available beginning Mid-July 2016 and continue through the fall and spring semesters. Applicants must be work study eligible. Preference will be for students who can start in July but Fall start is also possible. Preference will also be for someone with archaeological experience, but it is not required.

This position is for undergraduate students to assist Dr. Robert Hard with his research projects to gain practical research experience. Work will involve conducting research including working with samples, artifacts, library work, working with bibliographies, databases, administrative work, filing, and other duties as assigned

Please complete the attached application form and return to Dr. Hard (MH 4.04.32). Robert.Hard@utsa.edu

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A Day in the Life of an Archaeological Field Student (06/26/15)-By Overton Lesley

Today was the backfill day at the DOTMON site (AZ:CC:4:62 (ASM)). After all the excavating, screening, and paper work, the perfectly square hole (a 1x1m unit) we made in the ground must be backfilled and the site returned to its original state…almost. It is next to impossible to bring it back to how we found it, but we try. This practice is predominantly to clean up our mess and prevent injury, we did put in a 40cm pit after all.
Unlike the meticulous efforts archaeologists put in for excavating, back filling looks barbaric, with an almost haphazard technique of throwing rocks and tossing dirt into the unit. But it isn’t without symbolism. A common tradition is to place a historical item in the unit before sealing the unit. In our case Dr. Hard had tossed a few coins with recent dates in the unit. He said that these were for the next archaeologists who dug the site. It was our way of saying we were here, and now we are part of the history of this site.

Here I am shoveling dirt back into our unit at the DOT MON site (AZ:CC:4:62 (ASM)), while Dr. Hard (far left) and Robert Gardner (just to the left of me) pick up excavation tools.

Here I am shoveling dirt back into our unit at the DOT MON site (AZ:CC:4:62 (ASM)), while Dr. Hard (far left) and Robert Gardner (just to the left of me) pick up excavation tools.

A Day in the Life of an Archaeological Field School (06/25/15)-By Gabriella Zaragosa

Today Dr. Hard’s excavation crew (Megan Brown, Overton Lesley, and Robert Gardner) began to excavate unit Rock Ring A on the DOT MON site (AZ:CC:4:62 (ASM)). My fellow excavators dug into 3, 10cm levels successfully, while I filled out site forms, tags, and screened for artifacts. I wanted to dig so badly that I could feel the trowel burning in my back pocket, waiting to get dirty. But, there were other important tasks that needed to be taken care of before it was my turn to dig a level. Dr. Hard taught me the importance of testing the unit soil and the different types of soil that sand, silt, and clay can make when combined at different percentages. I also learned how to compare the color of the soil with the Munsell soil chart. I then mapped out level 1 and 2 after it had been completed. I felt cool being able to “eyeball” measurements onto the map. I had a blast, or created a blast of dirt while I screened for artifacts. To my surprise I found a lot of obsidian flakes, even in lower levels that were close to bedrock.

Here I am "creating a blast of dirt" while screening the unit's dirt.

Here I am “creating a blast of dirt” while screening the unit’s dirt.

The important unit/level paperwork I filled out. This paperwork keeps the excavation organized and will be a vital piece of the puzzle for compiling the report and for laboratory analysis.

The important unit/level paperwork I filled out. This paperwork keeps the excavation organized and will be a vital piece of the puzzle for compiling the report and for laboratory analysis.

A Day in the Life of an Archaeological Field School (6/23/15)-By Hayley Fishbeck

Today Andrea Thomas and I continued our excavations in our beloved rock ring designated ‘Feature E.’ It continues to yield interesting results, however, it is very much more than frustrating trying to dig through bedrock – yet we push on! So far we’ve recovered the base of a projectile point, a mano (used for food-grinding purposes), and a suspicious formation of five rocks in the middle of our feature. We will also took flotation samples from the fill underneath those rocks to see if we can get a hold of datable charcoal. A day in the life of an archaeological field school student is sweaty and overwhelming at times, but always exciting and rewarding as well. Today I learned how to create a profile map to understand the stratigraphy of the Northeast and Southeast Quadrant units; this type of map aids in the understanding of the various soils found in the feature, as well as the fill used to create a floor for the structure.

Here I am hard at work on excavating the Southeast Quadrant unit, level 3 of Feature E

Here I am hard at work on excavating the Southeast Quadrant unit, level 3 of Feature E

This is a picture of the profile map I drew with the help of Andrea Thomas and Megan Brown providing the profile measurements

This is a picture of the profile map I drew with the help of Andrea Thomas and Megan Brown providing the profile measurements